Thursday, 11 December 2014

My five most viewed blog posts of 2014

I write a blog every two or three days. I keep wondering if I'll run out of things to go on about, but up to now I have not. Semi retirement gives you more time to reflect and offer free advice! Blogger conveniently supplies information on page hits, so I am able to note which of my posts gets read (or at least glanced at).

I am sometimes surprised which posts get more attention than others. It can be a more profound reflection on teaching methodology, an exam-related or simply a very simple idea for the classroom. Anyway, for the record these are the five most viewed posts this year, in order of popularity:

1. http://frenchteachernet.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/draft-content-and-assessment-for-new.html

The clear winner, with 1496 page views. This was my take on the draft content of the proposed new MFL A-levels, the fruit of ALCAB's deliberations. We eagerly await the feedback from Ofqual on this. Rumour has it teachers were, like me, much less than impressed. I mean MUCH less. Essay in English? Boring topics? Translation reaffirmed? No thanks.

2. http://frenchteachernet.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/dans-ma-trousse.html

In second place with 1283 page views is the post entitled "dans ma trousse". I was having a little go at those who argue that using the pencil case in the classroom is dull. I try to make the "case" for using the "trousse" in all sorts of ways.

3. http://frenchteachernet.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/gcse-intermediate-revision-resources.html

In a solid third spot with 931 views comes my annual post offering my favourite GCSE revision links. I understand why teachers latch on to anything which they might supply to their students in the run-up to exams. I have been there.

4. http://frenchteachernet.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/implications-of-topics-to-be-covered-in.html

In fourth place on 801 views comes my blog about the implications of ALCAB's indicative topics for new A-levels. I was getting a bit hot under the collar about this during the summer holidays. Why? I could not believe what I was reading from ALCAB. Nor could the exam boards, as I understand it. My argument was that A-levels are not the same as an undergrad course and that Russell Group professors do not really understand what makes a good A-level lesson and what motivates 17-18 year-olds. My views remain precisely the same.

5. http://frenchteachernet.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/mfl-gcse-subject-content-april-2014.html

In fifth spot with a respectable 730 page views comes my review of the draft GCSE MFL subject content. Exam boards are now working on specs based on this. I worry less about this than A-level, though continue to regret the inclusion of translation. Michael Gove left his fingerprints on GCSE too. At least controlled assessments are gone and I welcome that.

Bubbling under were posts on the imperfect tense (basically a lesson plan based on a text), a World Cup football task and a post on flipping the classroom.

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