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Ryanair : lève-toi et vole

Article tiré de metrofrance.com

Payer moins cher restant debout. Payer plus cher en allant aux toilettes. Voilà ce que compte proposer la compagnie aérienne Ryanair à ses clients.

Un avion de 
la flotte de la compagnie aérienne low cost irlandaise Ryanair.
Image: metrofrance.com

Un avion de la flotte de la compagnie aérienne low cost irlandaise Ryanair.
Photo : bigpresh/flickr.com
La compagnie aérienne low cost Ryanair est passée à l'acte. Après avoir abandonné l'idée d'une taxe sur les gros, elle confirme vouloir lancer des offres de vols debout et rendre l'accès aux toilettes payant. Pour environ 5 livres (6 euros), il sera possible de voyager à moindre prix sur les vols de la compagnie mais au sacrifice du confort. Un espace "zone debout" va être créé à l'arrière des 250 avions qui composent la flotte de Ryanair.
"Nous avons l'intention de supprimer les dix derniers rangs des appareils pour pouvoir y mettre des stations verticales. De la sorte, nous aurons 15 rangs assis et l'équivalent de 10 rangs debout", a expliqué Michael O'Leary, le directeur de la compagnie irlandaise, selon le quotidien britannique Daily Telegraph.
Un porte-parole de Ryanair a précisé que Boeing avait été consulté pour pratiquer ces modifications et installer des "sièges verticaux" où la personne reste debout tout en étant attachée comme le veulent les consignes de sécurité. Le prix de ce type de billet devrait varier entre 5 et 10 euros. Reste encore à pratiquer des tests de sécurité sur ces sièges verticaux, ce qui sera fait l'année prochaine mais qui laisse sceptique l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale.
Par ailleurs, il a annoncé qu'il allait désormais falloir débourser 1 livre (1,20 euros) pour avoir accès aux commodités des appareils sur les vols de moins d'une heure. L'objectif est d'encourager les passagers à prendre leurs précautions et à utiliser les toilettes des aéroports plutôt que ceux présents à bord des avions. Il faut donc s'attendre à voir apparaître des toilettes à ouverture déclenchée par l'insertion d'une pièce de monnaie dans les avions de la compagnie low cost.

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D'autres idées pour Ryanair: (simplyflying.com)
The airline has launched a competition where anyone in Europe can suggest ideas by email to competition@ryanair.com on how RyanAir can make more money off their customers! The best idea wins €1,000.
Some of the wackiest ideas are already stated on RyanAir’s website:
  • Charging for toilet paper – with O’Leary’s face on it,
  • Charging €2.50 to read the safety cards,
  • Charging €1 to use oxygen masks,
  • Charging €25 to use the emergency exit,
  • Charging €50 for bikini clad Cabin Crew.

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