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Va-t-on interdire l'embauche des mannequins ultra-minces?

Here is a text I wrote today, loosely based on a piece in The Guardian who apparently sourced the story from Le Parisien. I did an initial translation using Google Translate (good time saver), which I corrected where necessary, adapted and simplified to work with AS level students. The theme is the French government's intention to introduce a bill to prevent fashion houses and modelling agencies from employing very thin models. Paris, I have heard, has a particular reputation for doing this.

On frenchteacher.net I added a range of tasks for discussion and translation. Here is the piece:

Selon le ministre de la Santé le gouvernement français compte soutenir un projet de loi interdisant les mannequins trop minces. Les agences de mannequins et maisons de mode risqueraient des amendes et les agents eux-mêmes à la prison pourraient aller en prison.

La France, soucieuse de son style, ses industries de mode et de luxe valant des dizaines de milliards d'euros, se joindront à l'Italie, l'Espagne et Israël, qui ont tous adopté des lois contre les mannequins trop minces sur les podiums ou dans des campagnes de publicité au début de 2013.

«Il est important de dire que les mannequins ont besoin de bien manger et prendre soin de leur santé, en particulier les jeunes femmes qui voient d’autres mannequins comme un idéal esthétique, » a déclaré le ministre de la Santé, Marisol Touraine.

La loi ferait respecter des contrôles de poids et imposerait des amendes allant jusqu'à 75,000 € pour toute violation, avec un maximum de six mois de prison pour le personnel impliqué, selon le quotidien Le Parisien.

Les mannequins devront présenter un certificat médical montrant un indice de masse corporelle (IMC) d'au moins 18, environ 55 kg (121 lb) pour une taille de 1,75 m (5,7 pi), avant d'être embauchées pour un travail et pendant quelques semaines après.
Les amendements du projet de loi proposent également des sanctions pour tout ce qui pourrait être perçue comme encourageant la minceur extrême, notamment sur des sites Web pro-anorexie qui glorifient des modes de vie malsains.

En 2007, Isabelle Caro, 28 ans, ex-mannequin anorexique française, est morte après avoir posé pour une campagne photographique pour sensibiliser le public à la maladie.

30-40,000 personnes en France souffrent d'anorexie, la plupart des adolescentes, a déclaré Veran, qui est médecin.

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